Safety is Sharing!

Welcome to our Blog.

What really makes a hero? Do you ever think about that?

Certainly, law enforcement, firefighters, doctors and all first responders come to mind. I think of people like Officer Ann Carrizales, the Stafford officer shot in the face and chest during a routine traffic stop in 2013. Never one to back down, she got back in her car, chased her suspects into Houston and apprehended one of three before seeking medical treatment. Today, she divides her time between protecting the community ("I was born to be a protector," Carrizales said, "I would gladly lay down my life to protect any of you”) and using her personal story of danger, the fight and triumph to give strength and inspiration to millions around the globe through her travel and public speaking.

Shredding shouldn’t be your sole defense. ID theft is more likely to result from data breaches, computer malware, a lost or stolen wallet and other devious methods, including thieves buying sensitive information on the scammer black market, instead of searching for it among discarded eggshells and coffee grounds. Still, at organized shred fests with monster machines or at home with a more compact confetti maker (always use a “micro-cut” or crosscut model), shredding is a simple step to add another layer of protection, not to mention more storage or shelf space.

I was simply organizing my kids’ backpacks when a bright blue sheet of paper fell right onto my lap. The title hit me like a ton of bricks; it simply read: TK graduation! RSVP Now! My stomach instantly sank. This notice meant my youngest child was graduating transitional kindergarten. Time was moving quickly and, let’s face it, we were all getting older. This thought made me want to cry. 

“There are three things I want to be when I grow up, Mommy.”

“What’s that?” I asked my first grader.

“Well, I can’t decide. I’ll either be a teacher, an astronaut or a police woman.” She paused. “I’m not sure which I’ll be. How will I know?”

Voxer? Yik Yak? Kik?

If you’re in a normal home, your teen (or tween, YIKES!) knows more about social media than you do. You know it. They know it. And that’s dangerous.

The images were horrific. Families losing everything. Houses and cars destroyed. Lives being forever changed. And I couldn’t help but think that with the rise of human tragedy often comes the rise of criminal opportunity.

What makes scams related to home repair particularly attractive to criminals is the reality that in Texas, residential contractors do not have to get a license. This fact leaves the door open for many to claim this title.

If you’re busy, it’s hard to go to the gym. If you’re a parent of young children, it’s almost impossible. Gym owners know this and in an effort to leave you with no excuses, many have added childcare services to their establishments.   

"Although Haruka loved to perform on stage she never sought the spotlight in her daily life. Perhaps the last thing she would want is to be the poster child for any cause,” the family wrote. “And yet, as we struggle to understand why she was killed, if her death can somehow make it safer for a young woman to walk home, if it will prevent another assault or murder, then at least we could find some meaning behind an otherwise senseless and tragic death.” (Source: Daily Texan)

Child abuse, whether it is physical, emotional or sexual in nature, is as much an act of terrorism as if a bomb exploded. The traumatic stress that abuse leaves in its wake is comparable to that of the most devastating terrorist explosion. The only difference is that an act of terrorism occurs and is over until the next evil plan to destroy. But for an abused child the nightmare of terror and abuse may occur daily and last for years.

Everyone knows I have three kids. I probably talk about them and share stories of their lives more than I should. 

People with children understand. The love we have for our children drives us, shapes our vision, our decisions and our plans. The love for our children keeps us up at night; the loss of a child is every parent’s worst nightmare.